Month: March 2014

How to mount your OneDrive as a local mapped drive

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EDIT: If you liked this post, I’ve updated my process a little bit and written a script to automate a good chunk of this! Go check out Part 2 of this blog! https://thetechl33t.com/2014/10/03/how-to-mount-your-onedrive-as-a-local-mapped-drive-part-2/

 

 

OneDrive is an online storage system by Microsoft that is included when you have an email account such as @live.com @hotmail.com etc. I use it fairly often and I was curious if I could map it locally, turns out that I can.

First of all, you need to go to https://onedrive.com and use your Windows Live account (the same you use to access Hotmail, Messenger, Windows Live Mail or MSN) to log in and create the folders you want to use by using the New menu. You can create private and shared folders and customize the access for every one of them.

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After your have created your folders and customized it to your liking, you will need to link your computer to your online ID so it can access them without asking for credentials every time.

Click on the Start Menu button and select Control Panel.

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Select User Accounts and Family Safety.

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Select User Accounts

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Select Link Online IDs, on the left side of the window.

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Click on Link Online ID.

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If you haven´t installed the Windows Live ID provider, you will be taken to a website to download it. If not, click the “Add an online ID provider” link in the above photo and it will take you there.

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Now you will be taken back to the Online ID providers and click on Link Online ID to sign in.

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Now, to get the address where to map your OneDrive´s folders, you can open Excel, Word, PowerPoint or OneNote click on File and then on Save & Send. Then click “Save to Web” and it will populate the OneDrive folders from the OnlineID you just linked, select that folder and click “Save As”.

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Double click on the folder you want to map and copy the folder´s address.

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Now that you have that link, go back to “Computer” and click “Map Network Drive”.

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Choose a drive letter, and paste that URL in there that was copied a few steps back.

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There ya go! You’ve now got your OneDrive linked locally!

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EDIT: If you liked this post, I’ve updated my process a little bit and written a script to automate a good chunk of this! Go check out Part 2 of this blog! https://thetechl33t.com/2014/10/03/how-to-mount-your-onedrive-as-a-local-mapped-drive-part-2/

5 free security tools for testing Windows

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One of the things you often find yourself thinking is, hmm…I should probably test my windows machines for security flaws, right? I’ve decided to share some very good tools for testing security from basic button clicking to advanced security testing.

As it relates to Windows-based computers, there are seven general types of security testing tools. These are:

  1. Port scanners
  2. Network/OS vulnerability scanners
  3. Application/database vulnerability scanners
  4. Password crackers
  5. File searching tools
  6. Network analyzers
  7. Exploit tools

All of these types of tools can and should be used when performing penetration tests, vulnerability assessments, and security audits on your Windows systems.

For the most part with security tools, you get what  you pay for. There are, however, a handful of free tools that are a solid choice.

Super Scan v3:  Very fast and easy to use port scanner that can find live systems, look for open ports and running services, grab banner information including software versions.

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http://www.mcafee.com/us/downloads/free-tools/superscan3.aspx

 

 

SoftPerfect Network Scanner:   Maps MAC addresses to IP addresses which can help you locate rogue wired and wireless systems.

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http://www.softperfect.com/products/networkscanner/

 

– WebFingerPrint:   Windows enumeration tool that can ferret out patch levels, NetBIOS information, user information, and more.

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http://winfingerprint.sourceforge.net/

 

Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer:  Checks your local machine to identify missing security updates and common security misconfigurations.

 

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http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=7558

 

– Metasploit:  A great tool to exploit those Windows-based vulnerabilities that other tools find, for advanced users only.

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http://www.metasploit.com/free-download/

 

 

 

As you build your compilation of security testing tools over time, you’ll find that there is no one best tool. Keep in mind that security tools are not the “easy button” for finding security vulnerabilities. That’s where Operating System, Application, Networking Knowledge, and most importantly, experience will come into play.

 

Where tools are required, you’ll see that the ones that are more specialized in finding specific types of vulnerabilities will provide you with the best results. It all comes down to personal preference and how comfortable you feel using each tool, but in the end your goal should be to find the greatest number of vulnerabilities, exerting the least amount of work, in the shortest amount of time. Get to know the tools on this list, use them consistently and you’ll be well on your way to a storm of work that you never thought you had before ;).