Storage

Changing Azure Recovery Services Vault to LRS Storage

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Back in the classic portal with backup services it was an easy fix. Simply change the settings value of storage replication type. I’ve recently started moving my workloads to recovery serveries vaults in ARM, and noticed something peculiar. By default, the storage replication type of the vault is GRS.

 

If your needs require geographically redundant storage, that that’s perfectly fine. I however don’t have such needs, and trust in Microsoft’s ability to keep data generally available in a LRS replication topology. It should be just like it was in classic, as an option anyways, right? Strangely, the option to change the replication type for the storage configuration on the vault is grayed out.

 

 

Odd, right? I thought so, until I found this.

 

Okay, well it’s not optimal but it looks like I need to remove the backup data from the vault to change the storage replication types right? Well, I gave that a shot and no go. I had the same issue, the option was still grayed out.

I ultimately had to completely delete, and create a new recovery services vault. Once it’s initially created you can change the replication type.

 

 

Ah, finally! Then register the VM(s), run some backup jobs and voila! Confirmation that the vault is using LRS storage.

 

I hope this makes your day at least a little bit easier.

Thanks,

Disk Performance on Server 2012 Task Manager

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Something that I’ve noticed not a lot people know, is how to get your disk performance to show up on a server’s task manager. Yes, yes, I know. With the new Microsoft model you shouldn’t be RDP’ing to servers anyways — but I still get asked how to do this. For some reason they have this by default on Windows 8, but not enabled on Servers. So here’s the one command you need to fix that.

1) The problem, no disk portion on task manager. šŸ˜¦

TaskManager

 

 

2) Run the following command to enable it.

“DiskPerf -Y”

This enables the physical and logical disk performance counters.

DiskPerf

 

 

3) Close and re-open task manager.

 

DiskYES

 

 

 

There ya go!

I hope I’ve made your day at least a little bit easier.

Config File Iteration Backup – Change Checking Config Files

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In a lot of environments that have developers that use a lot of config files, sometimes it would be nice to keep older versions of those files. Fortunately Microsoft has graced us with shadow copies so we can have “Previous Versions”. The only issue with that, is you can only can’t turn on shadow copies (as far as I know) for specific files. So what I did was write a powershell script to take care of that, in a round-about way.

What this script does, is wait until the file has been modified then copy it to an “archive” location and time stamp it so you can review older copies.

At the Ā beginning of this script there are two arrays that include variables of full paths to the files. “$OriginalPath” is the array that holds the full path to each file you want to watch. In the script here the two files I’m watching are “C:\configs\config1.txt” and “C:\configs\config2.txt”. Then the second array is where you want to archive the files to. In the script here it’s “C:\archive_configs\config1.txt” and “C:\archive_configs\config2.txt”.

 

What’s done after the arrays are initialize, is the time -1 minute and compares the last write value of the file in question to the current time -1 minute. If it has been modified, it copies to the archive location then modifies the name with a time stamp. Then loops back through if there are more files being checked in the array.

archive_stamped

 

What I’ve done is put this in Task Scheduler to run every 1 minute. If you want to modify that, take the line:

$1MinAgo = (get-date).AddMinutes(-1)

and you the “Minutes” portion and the “(-1)” portion can both be modified.

 

 

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Config-File-Iteration-ab2a69df

 

I hope I’ve made your day a little bit easier!

 

 

 

How to mount your OneDrive as a local mapped drive: Part 2

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A while back I wrote a blog post about how to map your OneDrive as a local drive (network drive) and it has been hugely popular (contrary to anything I could have imagined)

https://thetechl33t.com/2014/03/14/how-to-mount-your-onedrive-as-a-local-mapped-drive/

 

 

I’ve even seen it referred to in the Microsoft Community Forums. So I decided to share something that I played with, starting to write a tool to automate this otherwise lengthy process. Granted at this point it’s still at something of a Version 0.1, but I’ll share it anyways.

 

There are three things you need to have to make this tool do it’s magic.

  1. Your Microsoft CID
  2. Your Email
  3. Your Password

As long as you have those things the tool will do the rest!

 

The only thing here that you need to do is have your Microsoft CID, which isn’t too hard to do. Let’s help you grab that real quick!

First

 

  • Copy the CID in the top URL bar

Second

 

 

 

 

 

Once you have this ID copied, you’re all set! You can download the poweshell scriptĀ here.Ā Right click, and run with powershell!Ā *Note* Accessing OneDrive this way is NOT supported and may act sluggish at times.

 

In some free time I’ll be working on using the Windows Live APIs to automatically pull the CID in the next version of this application. I hope I’ve made your day a little bit easier!

 

How to mount your OneDrive as a local mapped drive

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EDIT: If you liked this post, Iā€™ve updated my process a little bit and written a script to automate a good chunk of this! Go check out Part 2 of this blog! https://thetechl33t.com/2014/10/03/how-to-mount-your-onedrive-as-a-local-mapped-drive-part-2/

 

 

OneDrive is an online storage system by Microsoft that is included when you have an email account such as @live.com @hotmail.com etc. I use it fairly often and I was curious if I could map it locally, turns out that I can.

First of all, you need to go to https://onedrive.comĀ and use your Windows Live account (the same you use to access Hotmail, Messenger, Windows Live Mail or MSN) to log in and create the folders you want to use by using the New menu. You can create private and shared folders and customize the access for every one of them.

onedrive_0

After your have created your folders and customized it to your liking, you will need to link your computer to your online ID so it can access them without asking for credentials every time.

Click on the Start Menu button and select Control Panel.

cnt_pannel

Select User Accounts and Family Safety.

useracct_2

Select User Accounts

useracct_3

Select Link Online IDs, on the left side of the window.

link_online_4

Click on Link Online ID.

link_online_5

If you havenĀ“t installed the Windows Live ID provider, you will be taken to a website to download it. If not, click the “Add an online ID provider” link in the above photo and it will take you there.

download_signon_6

Now you will be taken back to the Online ID providers and click on Link Online ID to sign in.

liveID_7

Now, to get the address where to map your OneDriveĀ“s folders, you can open Excel, Word, PowerPoint or OneNote click on File and then on Save & Send. Then click “Save to Web” and it will populate the OneDrive folders from the OnlineID you just linked, select that folder and click “Save As”.

doc_save_8

Double click on the folder you want to map and copy the folderĀ“s address.

url_9

Now that you have that link, go back to “Computer” and click “Map Network Drive”.

computer_10

map_11

Choose a drive letter, and paste that URL in there that was copied a few steps back.

map_12

There ya go! You’ve now got your OneDrive linked locally!

drive_13

 

 

EDIT: If you liked this post, Iā€™ve updated my process a little bit and written a script to automate a good chunk of this! Go check out Part 2 of this blog! https://thetechl33t.com/2014/10/03/how-to-mount-your-onedrive-as-a-local-mapped-drive-part-2/